Night Sky On a 4D Planet

Ideas about how a world with more than three spatial dimensions would work - what laws of physics would be needed, how things would be built, how people would do things and so on.

Night Sky On a 4D Planet

Postby PatrickPowers » Fri Mar 26, 2021 1:22 am

How the stars would look at night on a 4D planet. The ana-kata dimension is encoded directly as color and indirectly as size. The closer a star to the line of sight, the larger it is drawn. Stars far to the ana of the line of sight are white, far kata is red, and blue is in between.

This planet has an isoclinal rotation. Every point on the surface rotates at the same rate.

https://youtu.be/AhNJV6YjcBc Forward. From the surface of the planet in the direction of rotation of the planet.
https://youtu.be/Zm9mvMO_AdU Ana. From the surface of the planet looking ana of the direction of rotation of the planet.
https://youtu.be/AAf7glz0LFc Up. From the surface of the planet looking straight up.
Last edited by PatrickPowers on Sun Apr 25, 2021 3:19 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: Night Sky On a 4D Planet

Postby Challenger007 » Tue Apr 06, 2021 11:11 am

It looks very interesting. I like to learn something new about heavenly bodies. Humanity has already accumulated a huge amount of knowledge that I do not even have time to study the issue in detail.
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Re: Night Sky On a 4D Planet

Postby PatrickPowers » Mon May 17, 2021 1:04 am

Stars on a 4D planet by an observer on the surface looking in the direction of rotation with the Y of the screen as ana-kata instead up the usual up-down. https://youtu.be/H1uZR8DM_Y0

Up-down is encoded as the size of the star. The closer a star to the horizon, the larger it appears. So when it appears over the horizon it is maxium size. Each star shrinks as it rises. We see the front half of the hemisphere that is the sky. If the star shrinks to zero size then it has passed into the rearward half of the hemisphere that is the sky.

If we could see in 4D we would see each star taking a helical path. The center of each helix would appear as an upward arc. Here is displayed only the "front" half of the hemisphere of the sky so for each star we see at most one quarter of a turn of that helix. The following downward arc isn't seen here. Stars close to the edge, off to the side, never get far above the horizon. They remain large but are visible for a shorter time and we see less than a quarter turn of their helix.

This is for a planet where every point on the surface moves at the same speed. For other planets one would see less than one quarter of a turn of each star's helix.
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