Sound in higher dimensions

Ideas about how a world with more than three spatial dimensions would work - what laws of physics would be needed, how things would be built, how people would do things and so on.

Sound in higher dimensions

Postby ParticleXLR8R » Sun Jul 14, 2019 1:05 am

According to the dimensional features page, a signal in 5D is distorted such that the signal received is the first derivative of the original signal. I've wondered what that would sound like, but Google and YouTube searches have been terribly fruitless and disappointing. All I get is "put on your headphones, close your eyes, and meditate" >:( What does the first derivative of a sound signal sound like? Like, if you took a song or a voice sample and played it in 5D, what does that first derivative sound like?

http://hi.gher.space/wiki/Dimensional_Features_Summary
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Re: Sound in higher dimensions

Postby PatrickPowers » Mon Jul 22, 2019 8:39 pm

I seem to recall long ago using an analog synthesizer that had a derivative function. You got a very trebly version of the sound. But that was all a long time ago so I wouldn't swear on it.

It also did integrals, which were bassy.
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Re: Sound in higher dimensions

Postby Foxbat_25 » Fri Aug 23, 2019 4:04 pm

Hello! I'm a newcomer on this forum, and I'm not that familiar with the ideas of additional dimensions; which is why I've created an account here, I want to fill this void in my brain.
And I have a question: when you are talking about the effects of a 4th of 5th dimension on sound, what dimensions are you talking about? Because the effect of this dimension would be radically different on sound according to what it is; for example, I've heard descriptions of the 4th dimension as a new directional one, some saying that the 4th dimension is time...
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Re: Sound in higher dimensions

Postby wendy » Sat Aug 24, 2019 8:07 am

There is no particular order to the dimensions. We don't count "time" into this mix.

If you construct three dimensions out of 2d and time, you end up with a pile of slides, where you flick through the slides and get an illusion of time. This is how animation pictures are made. But in that case, you is not just a 'blob', but a lengthy snake-like form, where any section is you at that slice of time.

In practice, we say 'length-width-height', since height is less important than the other two, which are extensive. You can walk miles of length and width, but not of height. The "proper" order for imagining higher dimensions, is 'height, forward, across'. Height supposes we are standing in a gravitaional field, on the ground. Forward suggests a linear time scale, and that motion is to the front. (Plants have lesser need for this, and have no clear front/back thing). The rest are simply variations in turning. You can get an illusion of this, by placing clocks on the floor, and supposing that it's the plan of the room, and the height is 'forward'. The wall-flowers who dot the edge of the dance hall face inwards, (ie clockwise up), but no law of physics tells them the 12's must point the same way. So there is no left/right direction. The clockwise thing still matters.

Sound then, passing through four dimensions, is like three dimensions, an ever-expanding sphere. Our ears are but a point or two in this space, we can hear stereo from the differences in sound.
The dream you dream alone is only a dream
the dream we dream together is reality.

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Re: Sound in higher dimensions

Postby Foxbat_25 » Fri Aug 30, 2019 5:20 am

Okay, thanks for the in-depth answer, I was sort of lost with all of the new information that's present on the forum at first :oops:
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